Gut-healthy baked overnight oatmeal with peaches, blueberries and milk kefir sauce

Servings: 5-6

INGREDIENTS

Baked oats:

  • 2 cup (100g) gluten-free spouted rolled oats (old-fashioned rolled oats are ok too)

  • 2 tbs (~20g) flax seeds

  • 2 tbs (~20g) chia seeds

  • 2 large, firm peaches, pitted, and sliced into wedges

  • 1 cup fresh blueberries

  • 2 tbs (~30 ml) melted ghee

  • 1 cup (~500 ml) full-fat cow’s milk kefir

  • 2 tbs maple syrup

  • 1/2 tsp salt


DIRECTIONS

  1. Place the oats on a saucepan and add enough boiling water to cover them completely. Cover, set aside and leave to soak overnight.

  2. Next morning, preheat your oven to 375ºF and position a rack in the center of the oven.

  3. Melt the ghee in a 12-inch cast iron pan, making sure to coat all the sides of the pan. Pour into a bowl and set aside.

  4. Add half of the soaked oats to the pan, spreading them evenly until you cover the whole pan. Sprinkle 1 tbs of chia and flax seeds and a pinch of salt.

  5. Lay half of the peach wedges and blueberries on top of the oats, and repeat the layering process: soaked oats, peaches, berries, and salt.

  6. Mix the milk kefir and the maple syrup and drizzle half of this mixture over the oats.You may need to add less of this if the dish looks too wet. Add only enough to cover the mixture, making sure it all looks moistened enough.

  7. Drizzle with melted ghee and transfer the pan to the oven.

  8. Bake for 30-40 minutes, turning the pan around half-way through the time, to make sure it bakes evenly.

  9. Take the baked oatmeal out and let it cool slightly. Serve drizzled with more sweetened kefir if desired.

What are the benefits of this dish?

Peaches, blueberries and oats, are all great sources of a type of soluble fiber called pectin. Soluble fiber absorbs water in the intestine forming a gel that slows digestion. This causes you to feel full longer and to slow the absorption of glucose, which affects blood sugar levels, an important factor in controlling diabetes.

Soluble fibers are also prebiotics, carbohydrate compounds that we cannot digest but the bacteria in our colon can.

Prebiotics are known to selectively affect the composition and/or activity of one or a limited number of bacteria in the colon, improving our health. [1]

Source: This dish is modified from www.bojongourmet.com. To see the original recipe, click here.